yamaha-yzf-r15-v-3-0 On Road Price?

yamaha-yzf-r15-v-3-0 On Road Price in Durg, Chhattisgarh

yamaha-yzf-r15-v-3-0:- Cost, Durg Variant Name Ex-Showroom Cost YZF R15 V 3.0 Racing Blue RTO Insurance TCS On-Road Price* 1,47,900* 22,185* 4,270* – 1,74,500* 4,302* – 1,76,000* YZF R15 V 3.0 Dark Knight 1,49,000*, 22,350*, and ₹1,50,000* ₹22,500* ₹4,331* – ₹1,77,000* YZF R15 V 3.0, Bhilai Variant Name, On-Road Price, Ex-Showroom Price YZF R15 V 3.0 Racing Blue RTO Insurance TCS On-Road Price* 1,47,900* 22,185* 4,270* – 1,74,500* 4,302* – 1,76,000* YZF R15 V 3.0 Dark Knight 1,49,000*, 22,350*, and ₹1,50,000* ₹22,500* ₹4,331* – ₹1,77,000** The pricing given here for the Yamaha YZF R15 V 3.0 On Road is for informational purposes only; real prices may differ. Get in touch with the Yamaha dealer closest to

you for current rates.

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Yamaha YZF R15 V 3.0 price in other cities in Chhattisgarh. Choose a city from the list below and click ‘Find Price’.

The YZF R15 V 3.0 on-road price listed above is exclusive of any offers announced by the company. For a test ride and booking of YZF R15 V 3.0 contact one of the 3 Bhilai Yamaha dealers.

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02

Coolest Sportbikes of the ’90s: 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02

The Yamaha was the last of the “real” Japanese homologation special models.

Provided by Cycle World Yamaha was the last of the “real” Japanese homologation special models. The Yamaha was the last of the “real” Japanese homologation special models. (Yamaha/)

Motorcycle manufacturers competing in World Superbike, AMA Superbike, British Superbike, and other production-based series homologated special motorcycles in the late 1980s and early 1990s to comply with the “production standards.” In other words, they had to produce a small number of racebikes if their racebikes included certain trick components, cutting-edge materials, or special chassis geometries that weren’t present in ordinary production models.

As a result, race car enthusiasts were treated to the Honda RC30 and RC45, Yamaha OW01, Ducati 888 SP4S, Suzuki GSX-R750 LE, and later the first R7, officially known as the YZF-R7 OW02. Theoretically, you could stroll up to the dealer and get on any of them.

All of the bikes were rare, but it could be argued that the R7 was uniquely so, with only 500 bikes produced between 1999 and 2000, and only 50 of those imported to the US in 1999. At the time, if you weren’t Yamaha itself, you had to have a racing résumé to get one of the remaining units not allocated for the factory AMA Superbike team. It was also one of the last Japanese homologation specials. Don Canet, Cycle World’s road test editor at the time, was the lucky guy who flew to Spain in ‘99 to test the bike at the Circuit de Jerez.

Related: Gallery: Yamaha Superbike Temple

Only a handful of R7s found their way to the US; all were initially earmarked for racing.

Provided by Cycle World Only a handful of R7s found their way to the US; all were initially earmarked for racing. Only a handful of R7s found their way to the US; all were initially earmarked for racing. (Cycle World Archives/)

An interesting fact about the bike was that it was sold in a low-horsepower configuration; 106 hp to be exact.

According to Canet at the time, “the engine is detuned as marketed to comply to Germany’s maximum power regulation.” “Yamaha decided to keep things simple and inexpensive by giving every R7 presently being produced the same 106 horsepower state of tune—14 less than the claim for R6s sold in the United States. This fact emphasizes the machine’s principal goal of being converted for a road race. The supply of R7s won’t last for very long.

The inline-four engine’s basic design was the same as that of the YZF-R1. According to Canet, the 749cc engine of the R7 has a one-piece cylinder/crankcase and a compact vertically stacked, three-axis gearbox. The motor is quick and rev-happy thanks to its 72 x 46mm short-stroke size and low reciprocating mass. An 11.4:1 compression ratio was produced via titanium connecting rods and forged aluminum pistons with nickel-coated crowns.

The combustion chambers and intake ports of the five-valves-per-cylinder head were CNC-machined. Ti valves were operated by full-race-spec cams. Two injectors per cylinder were part of the fuel-injection system: one was located below the throttle valve and the other was located above the velocity stack. The race-kit wire harness, which when inserted into the ECU unlocked the engine’s full power potential, was required if you wanted to use the engine’s full capacity. magic.

Yamaha YZF R15 V 3.0

Provided by Cycle World At the Jerez press launch, the bikes had been uncorked with the official Yamaha race kits. At the Jerez press launch, the bikes had been uncorked with the official Yamaha race kits. (Yamaha/)

Bikes at that Jerez test had been uncorked, but Japanese engineers weren’t willing to give up the details. “My seat-of-the-pants impression would suggest in the neighborhood of 145 horses at the rear wheel,” Canet said. “Put another way: Wheelspin off a fourth-gear corner? No problem. Power wheelies? How many gears do you want to carry it?”

Yamaha YZF R15 V 3.0

Provided by Cycle World The opening layout to our 1999 story with studio magic by Brian Blades. The opening layout to our 1999 story with studio magic by Brian Blades. (Cycle World Archives/)

Canet added: “Other engine-related mods on the bike I rode at Jerez included a kit head gasket (one of five available thicknesses) used to adjust squish area and raise compression; race-spec surface-discharge spark plugs; high-flow fuel pump and regulator; and an airbox kit that replaces the stocker’s snorkel lid with a sealed carbon-fiber top. The coolest-looking kit bit? The radiator set, a massive, double-row work of art offering extra capacity and great surface area than the standard two-piece item.”

Chassis highlights included Öhlins suspension front and rear with a 43mm inverted fork up front and a piggyback shock. Back in ‘99 that was far from the norm. The bike came standard with four-piston R1-style calipers and 320mm discs in the front. But at the test, the bike Canet rode had been upgraded with six-pot Nissin billet calipers with stainless rotors from the race kit.

Related: Retrospective: Yamaha FZ750

Yamaha YZF R15 V 3.0

Provided by Cycle World Don Canet at Jerez at the 1999 press launch. Don Canet at Jerez at the 1999 press launch. (Yamaha/)

As for riding the R7, Canet had this to say: “I was immediately taken by how incredibly smooth everything was. From the feathery-light clutch pull to the engine’s silky sewing-machine feel, to the chassis’ nimble, neutral steering, the R7 experience was like riding in seventh heaven. With plenty of midrange power to play with, taking Jerez’s hairpins a gear taller was a viable option that still had the front wheel floating on the exit. Ripping through the close-ratio gearbox on either of Jerez’s straights was a festival of sound and fury.”

Yamaha YZF R15 V 3.0

Provided Cycle World Canet estimated that the R7 with the race kit made around 145 hp at the rear wheel. Canet estimated that the R7 with the race kit made around 145 hp at the rear wheel. (Yamaha/)

Back in 2013, Cycle World invited Freddie Spencer out to revisit a bunch of these homologation specials in our “Superbikes with Soul” feature. After riding bikes including the older RC30, FZR750RR OW01, Ducati 888 SP4S, and Suzuki GSX-R750 LE, Spencer said of the beautifully restored R7: “We just moved into the modern age. This is the first bike that needs a steering damper. It’s also the first bike that is starting to feel fast.”

The R7 seemed “contemporary in its handling,” and [Spencer and I] both felt comfortable riding it hard because there were no reminders of its age, tester Nick Ienatsch stated in that same piece when we raced the bikes at Chuckwalla Valley Raceway. In 1999, Yamaha made an effort to accurately reproduce Wayne Rainey’s YZR500 GP chassis by adding Ohlins suspension components and a slipper clutch. When you consider that many of those once-trick parts were made accessible on production motorcycles for the general buying public to enjoy, it makes complete sense. It was essentially the last example of the era, just at the onset of shifting trends in sportbikes.

Yamaha YZF R15 V 3.0

Provided by Cycle World Noriyuki Haga threw the R7 down the road at the opening race of the World Superbike series in Kyalami, South Africa, in 1999. Noriyuki Haga threw the R7 down the road at the opening race of the World Superbike series in Kyalami, South Africa, in 1999. (Cycle World Archives/Gold & Goose/)

As the last of the Japanese homologation specials, the R7 closed a chapter in Superbike racing before the rules changed to 1,000cc production-based bikes in most racing series around the world. When the bike was first put to use on track in the World Superbike series in 1999, Noriyuki Haga was on board. Haga got his first win in Race 1 at Albacete in Spain, four events into the season, and then went on to record four more wins in 2000. That was it for the R7 and Yamaha in WBSK; the machines went to 1,000cc engines in 2002, and Yamaha didn’t return for another year.

1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 Specifications

MSRP: $32,000 (1999) Engine: DOHC, liquid-cooled inline-four; 5 valves/cyl. Displacement: 749cc Bore x Stroke: 72.0 x 46.0mm Compression Ratio: 11.4:1 Transmission/Final Drive: 6-speed/chain Claimed Horsepower: 106 hp @ 11,000 rpm Claimed Torque: 53.0 lb.-ft. @ 8,000 rpm Fuel System: EFI Clutch: Wet, multi-plate Engine Management/Ignition: CDI Frame: Deltabox twin-spar aluminum Front Suspension: 43mm Öhlins inverted fork, fully adjustable; 4.7 in. travel Rear Suspension: Öhlins piggyback shock, fully adjustable; 5.4. in. travel Front Brake: 4-piston calipers, 320mm discs Rear Brake: 2-piston Nissin caliper, 245mm disc Tires, Front/Rear: 120/70-17 / 180/55-17 Rake/Trail: 22.8°/3.75 in. Wheelbase: 55.1 in. Ground Clearance: 5.4 in. Seat Height: 33.1 in. Fuel Capacity: 5.8 gals. Claimed Dry Weight: 388 lb.

03

Is A 25th Anniversary Yamaha YZF-R1 Slated For A 2023 Release?

Yamaha YZF R15 V 3.0

RideApart.com 2023 Yamaha YZF-R1 25th Anniversary Render – Cover

MotoGP-style winglets? Throwback livery? Please, make it so, Yamaha. Yamaha introduced the original YZF-R1 in 1998. Helped along by Valentino Rossi and Team Blue’s MotoGP accomplishments throughout the aughts, the superbike gained a faithful following over the past 25 years. Yamaha hasn’t revealed any plans to commemorate that quarter-century milestone but it doesn’t stop media outlets from prognosticating.

Chief among the speculators is Japan’s Young Machine. The publication certainly boasts a winning record, with many of its reported “rumors” coming to fruition. In Young Machine’s October 2022 issue, the outlet runs with the R1’s 25th-anniversary idea and imagines all the possibilities with a digital render.

As concepts go, the artist dreams big, outfitting the legendary liter bike with MotoGP-inspired winglets and a livery reminiscent of the 1998 YZF-R1. Dazzling in signature Yamaha white and red race colors, the re-envisioned R1 even adopts the ‘90s-styled YZF logo along the side fairing.

Yamaha YZF R15 V 3.0

Provided by RideApart 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1Young Machine 2023 Yamaha YZF-R1 Render

Provided by RideApart Young Machine 2023 Yamaha YZF-R1 RenderYoung Machine 2023 Yamaha YZF-R1 Render

While Young Machine takes liberties with the superbike’s bodywork and paint scheme, actual documents reinforce the idea that Yamaha will launch a new R1 variant in 2023. In June 2022, a YZF1000W listing showed up on the FIM Recognized Competition Vehicles file. The document categorizes the YZF1000W as a “Road race” model harnessing a four-stroke, 998cc, four-cylinder engine.

The YZF600W nomenclature of the track-only YZF-R6 Race suggests that this new-liter bike entry is an R1 that has been prepared for competition. The key question, however, is whether the closed circuit model affects the manufacturing unit.

In past years, many anticipated that an improved R1 would introduce Yamaha’s seamless gearbox. Sadly, there was no such communication with the 2020 upgrade. The bLU cRU already has patents for a road-going seamless gearbox unit, but it’s unclear if the company abandoned the project because of homologation requirements or production limitations.

When I say that the upgraded transmission would be a welcome sight in the sector, I believe I speak for all sportbike enthusiasts. Of course, adding a MotoGP winglet set and a 25th-anniversary livery wouldn’t be a terrible idea either.

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